The Secret Reason Why Ryan Reynolds’ McRib Flavored Cocktail Is Actually Sheer Genius

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In honor of the 40th anniversary of the McRib sandwich, Ryan Reynolds concocted a cocktail with flavors of McRib. In a 60 second promotional video, Reynolds prepares a four-ingredient gin-based cocktail to mimic the flavor of the world’s favorite “rib-shaped sandwich”, paired with a “glass-shaped cocktail.” But the genius of the wacky marketing stunt isn’t that it’s promoting McRib or Aviation Gin, but Reynolds.

Actors, like businesses, depend on marketing to contribute to their continued success. And so it might seem odd for an actor who’s said to be worth around $ 150 million to play producing silly fast food cocktail videos, it’s the very kind of thing that helped him become one of the most successful actors of our time.

The assumption, for many, will be that the video is a marketing tool for Aviation Gin, a brand that is on Reynold’s business list, and which it sold last year for $ 610 million. While this gives him an obvious interest in the success of the brand, he doesn’t present it as the key ingredient in a McRib-tasting cocktail, as he seeks to move the product or build the brand by pairing it with McDonald’s.

What Aviation Gin and McDonald’s are effectively doing is masking the fact that Reynolds is marketing himself. The video, which appears to be an advertisement for McDonald’s or Aviation Gin, is not actually about either and serves a much larger purpose that helps ensure the actor’s future and continued success.

The video serves as a tool to remind us that Reynolds is funny and charismatic. His role in apparent advertising is awesome in that he positions him to convey a sense of raw honesty as he pokes fun at the product he seems to be promoting – something every audience appreciates and a brand of. great actor.

In show business and business in general, staying at the top of the list is vital, even for well-known players in the business. Even if the actor turned entrepreneur, who was crowned one of the most creative people in business by Fast Company targets projects outside of Hollywood, he is a marketing tool for any brand he creates or project he works on. To maintain itself as an effective marketing tool, it must continue to make itself known through recall advertising.

This is the reason why mature household brands, like Kleenex, are spending $ 100 million in ads per year, or why Coca-Cola spends around $ 4 billion per year in advertising. It’s not because either brand is promoting a new product or even trying to attract new consumers. On the contrary, many well-established brands, such as Coca-Cola, market differently, seeming to be just a recent memory in your mind. In doing so, you are more likely to grab a box of Kleenex or go for a coke the next time you are faced with the decision to drink.

Reminder advertising can be an incredibly powerful tool, but it needs to be very discreet. That’s why companies like these don’t just coat Facebook with their ads. Instead, they sponsor charities, develop partnerships and co-brands, and even build venues for events such as the Coliseum Coca-Cola in Toronto. Because a brand’s goals evolve as the brand grows, mature brands recognizable among the very old and the very young, and in all countries, like Coca-Cola and Ryan Reynolds, must deploy advertisements. strategically to feel organic.

What these billion dollar multinational brands are teaching companies of all sizes and skill levels is that good marketing, like good acting, doesn’t tell audiences who they are. They show the audience who they are – no billion dollar advertising budget is required. And in recall advertising, they continue to show the public who they are, further strengthening their brand or character and the future of their business.

The advertisement for Reynold’s McRib Taste Cocktail shows the world who Reynolds is, reminding us of the very reason the world loves him. And solidify his influence so that any business he touches automatically has an effective marketing tool behind it: him.

The opinions expressed here by the columnists of Inc.com are theirs and not those of Inc.com.


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